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CATALOGUES

From the early seventies onwards each new show at Studio la Città has been accompanied either by a catalogue or by an information sheet about the artist's activity. Since 1994 the catalogues published in each season have been bound into a single volume. They are, however, also available singly.

Catalogs are all available at our gallery or they can be purchased online by sending a request to: pubblicazioni@studiolacitta.it

Back to the Land - 2016
brochure 8 pages - essays by Andrea Lerda and Serenella Iovino
(Italian/English)
26 riproduzioni a colori
€ 12
Un racconto in sei stanze - May 2016
52 pages - conversation between Angela Madesani and Hélène de Franchis (Italian/English)
26 color reproductions
€ 5
De Rerum Natura – May 2014
52 pages - text by Angela Madesani (Italian/English)
20 color reproductions
€ 20.00
Cloud Factory
Anna Galtarossa and Daniel Gonzàlez – November 2012
Brochure 8 pages
text by Giacinto di Pietrantonio (Italian/English)
7 color reproductions
€ 5
OFF-SCREEN - Luglio 2012
38 pages - text by Francesco Zanot (Italian/English)
20 color reproductions
€ 25
AD LUCEM. Arte Contemporanea per Arvo Pärt - Ottobre 2011
63 pages - text by Angela Madesani (Italian/English)
27 colour reproductions - NOMOS Editions
€ 25
Una Prospettiva Italiana
An Italian Perspective
Ma lo sguardo vede? – February 2011
Brochure 8 pages
text: A virtual conversation between G.
Basilico, V. Castella, M. Vitali coordinated
by Angela Madesani (Italian/English)
4 colour reproductions
2 black/white
€ 8
preview catalogue




A virtual conversation between Gabriele Basilico, Vincenzo Castella, and Massimo Vitali, coordinated by Angela Madesani.

Una prospettiva italiana/ An Italian Perspective. But is looking seeing?
This is an overview of an important period in Italian photography and the thinking related to it. The show's aim is to spark off a debate about new views, wider perspectives, and thoughts on the identity of Italian photography through the work of three artists: Gabriele Basilico, Vincenzo Castella, and Massimo Vitali.

A.M. The show's subtitle is in fact a query: is looking seeing?
V.C. That question mark makes it clear that self-evident principles are in play. To ask this question already means to state that the eye by itself does not see. Looking and seeing are two different things. G.B. For years we have discussed the difference between looking and seeing. Seeing ought to be something subtle that examines and arrives at the heart of things, that allows us to discover what we are looking at but that we do not see clearly because it is often not all that clear. V.C. I believe that a "look" and the rhetoric associated with it is something pretentious and narcissistic. It is "seeing" that allows the eye to fall on what it recognizes and that is recognized by the person looking at it. The concept of "vision" is a more organized form which implies complex proprieties; it is the point of arrival of a plan which aims at transmitting each fact of experience and all the need of others. It is the moment of sharing all the work that has been undertaken.

A.M. To go back a moment: is seeing the phase that proceeds observation?
G.B. No. Perhaps seeing is the successive phase. It is important to analyze the way in which this happens. When you are in the field it is as though you were scanning reality. Then the idea of reality, of the landscape, is multiplied in the infinite sea of the world's aspects. Today the Internet manages all this in such a rapid manner that it is consumed immediately. At the very moment you choose a point of view a new one is immediately created.

A.M. Do such artists as you have a privileged look?
G.M. Probably yes, even if I like to think I have an equidistant view, a "democratic" one. ...

Art 41 Basel – June 2010
Antipodi - Antipodes
20 pages - text by Marco Meneguzzo
(Italian/English)
19 black and white images
€ 12
preview catalogue


THE ANTIPODES

Once upon a time we believed that the other side of the world was inhabited by weird and strange beings. Yet today we tend to look at its inhabitants in order to see if such a worn- out civilisation as our own might be able to use, understand, and be reinvigorated by, the expressive means of peoples from the antipodes: because for us the artistic antipodes are cultures which, until now, have been kept on the sidelines: cultures such as those of Asia, Africa, or West European minorities. And these are the new frontiers of art. It is here that Studio la Città has searched for new artists, though without in any way reneging on its Eurocentric art activity.

And so, by putting side-by-side extremely different artists, artists who we might say are at the antipodes (such as the Italians Gabriele Basilico, Pier Paolo Calzolari, Vincenzo Castella, Giulio Paolini, and Ettore Spalletti; the Indian artists Hema Upadhyay, Balaji Ponna, and Jagannath Panda; the Americans Nick Cave and Jacob Hashimoto; the Australian Shaun Gladwell; and the Russian video-artist Victor Alimpiev), we can create stimulating artistic interconnections. (...)

Art 40 Basel – June 2009
Contemporary Exoticism
20 pages - text by Marco Meneguzzo
(Italian/English)
15 black and white images
€ 12
Art 39 Basel – June 2008
Ur-Formen, Ur-Objekten, Ur-Erzähalungen
20 pages - text by Marco Meneguzzo
(Italian/English)
11 black and white images
€ 12
The Armory Show – March 2010
Exotic / Heretic / Erotic
Project curated by Marco Meneguzzo for Studio la Città e Oredaria Arti Contemporanee
- Dedicated to Claudia Gian Ferrari -
20 pages - (Italian/English)
16 black and white images
€ 12
preview catalogue


EXOTIC, HERETIC, EROTIC

What do we ask of art today?

That it be new, and novelty - or so it seems - can only be discovered at ever further frontiers and boundaries which are, in fact, ever nearer, within grasp: unusual, uncommon, and distant are by now convenient words to use, “mass” terms for the masses. We are in search of adventure but it is necessary for it to be completely controllable, to be within the bounds of what is predictable and foreseeable. Today, instead, real novelty consists in the unexpected, in a mental place where different – and thus new - relationships can be re-established between known elements. And so, once it has been discovered that the planet is a finite space, and not even a very large one, we have to look for exoticism elsewhere, perhaps in “a room of one’s own”, the only place for possible novelty. EXOTIC

That it be amazing, dissident, critical, dissenting. This is its most difficult characteristic today: we know what to dissent from, but fine feelings, political correctness, and an awareness of being on the side of reason risk becoming art’s orthodoxy, above all because the language used has by now become a “book of anti-conformist etiquette”. Paradoxically, even wickedness has become codified, in the same way that the world’s “wicked” have been identified and revealed to our thoughts; however, by doing this we are doing nothing other than tiredly repeating the same language over and again, concentrating everything on the theme of the day, on our daily (and thus ephemeral) object of moral indignation. (...)

The Armory Show – March 2009
Italy Post Contemporary
20 pages - text by Marco Meneguzzo
(Italian/English)
11 black and white images
€ 12
Lanscape As A Dream - February 2009
Brochure 6 pages - text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
9 colour reproductions - 2 black/white
€ 8
preview catalogue




Landscape as a Dream

The landscapes of the third millennium are many, new, and infinite: above all they are undergoing continuous changes. All their reference points are shifted daily, and visual balance and depth are “regularly shattered against appearances and illusions” which are more numerous every day and as quick to appear as to disappear. It is not by chance that we speak about the “urbanised countryside” and, at the same time, about “city spread” in order to indicate somewhere that can no longer be placed, one defined only by its dispersion throughout the area of objects, people, and activities. The most frequent perception of contemporary space is that of an infinite multiplication of visual possibilities and the increasing enlargement of occasions for discovery. Except that with this “excess of seeing” our view is blinded: it loses the depth of the experience, it becomes omnivorous, too fast and distracted to be translated into feelings and meaning.

How then are we to recuperate a visual knowledge that does not seem to be already resolved and overexploited? How can reality and its appearances be cracked open? Perhaps only by superseding them, overcoming them and, then, dusting off myths, Utopias, and fantasies in order to take what is already known back to a state of “distance” (distance understood as nostalgia, deviations, horizon, shadow etc. …). Having lost the dream of a pure, natural world, there is no other alternative than to build new tales on the basis of familiar, “transparent” landscapes. The artists in this show seem to be in search of new narratives and tales because the problem is not any longer one about how to represent reality, but about just which reality to represent: Perhaps it would be better to say the problem is no longer one of reproducing or investigating the outer limits of our experience but the far more radical one of almost re-establishing them, of creating a new visual alphabet, one able to unify our gaze and our vision, inside and outside, both a survey and revelation of places. It is an art that follows a passion for Elsewhere, the aspiration towards an imaginary cosmography.

The world that these artists discover and construct (the natural and cultural landscape) might not be ready and waiting in the Elsewhere, but it is certainly the Elsewhere that helps them to find it.

Like Italo Calvino’s Marco Polo they are forced to journey (and thus observe the nature of things from various points of view) if they actually intend to describe “invisible cities” which, like dreams, “are built on desires and fears”. But what is really meant by the term “Elsewhere”? The Elsewhere is the breaking up of models, of the clichés we are in the habit of using for observing the things that surround us: it is the suggestion of worlds beyond our own limited horizon. A fluidising of spatial constructions and of the forms themselves: a continual transformation. (…)

Luigi Meneghelli

India Crossing - March 2008
40 pages - essay by Marco Meneguzzo and Shaheen Merali
(Italian English)
40 colour illustrations
€ 15

“ORIENTALISMI – FORMS OF ORIENTALISM” Trenta fotografie della fine del XIX secolo in relazione a: GABRIELE BASILICO, LUCA CAMPIGOTTO, DANIELA COMANI, LYNN DAVIS TARIN, GARTNER, SHIRIN NESHAT, MARCO ZANTA – Novembre 2005
32 pagine – testo di Angela Madesani (italiano/inglese) 21 Riproduzioni a colori
€ 15

IL NODO PARLANTE - February 2005
Letizia Cariello, Laura Marchetti, Arthur Duff, Davide Nido
16 pages - essay by Luigi Meneghelli (italiano/inglese)
16 illustrations in black and white
€ 10

INTERROGARE IL LUOGO - 8 February 2003
Marina Ballo Charmet, Davide Bramante, Jean Marc Bustamante, Monica Carocci, Giacomo Costa, Roland Fischer, Armin Linke, Sven Påhlsson, Thomas Struth, Alexander Timtschenko, Michael Wesely. Introductory essay by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
32 pages - 15 colour illustrations, 2 black and white.
€ 10
IL RESPIRO NASCOSTO DELLE COSE - December 2001
Pier Paolo Calzolari, Lawrence Carroll, Lena Liv, Mirco Marchelli, Mario Merz, Pino Pascali, Giuseppe Penone, Michelangelo Pistoletto, Mariella Poli, Roberta Silva, Nanni Valentini, Richard Wentworth. Introductory essay by Luigi Meneghelli
32 pages (Italian/English)
11 colour illustrations, 1 black and white
€ 15
MORBIDA QUIETE E LA NOTTE - SOFT STILLNESS AND THE NIGHT - October 1999
Stuart Arends, Max Cole, Lena Liv, Emil Lukas, Julia Mangold, Mirco Marchelli, Ross Rudel, Ettore Spalletti + Giorgio Morandi. Introductory essay by Michael Haggerty
32 pages (English/Italian)
21 colour illustrations, 16 black and white
€ 15
VERBA LUCIS - May 1999 (published by: Hopfulmonster, Turin)
Pier Paolo Calzolari, Dan Flavin, Lucio Fontana, Joseph Kosuth, Mario Merz, François Morellet, Maurizio Nannucci, Keith SonnierIntroductory essay by Mario Bertoni
32 pages (Italian/English)
18 colour illustrations
€ 15
E LA CHIAMANO PITTURA - June 1996
Uta Barth, Stefano Cattaneo, Christian Eckart, Herbert Hamak, Imi Knoebel, Ross Rudel, David Simpson. Introductory essay by Mario Bertoni
32 pages (Italian/English)
8 colour illustrations, 16 black and white
€ 15
TOOLBOX - May 1993
Luigi Carboni, Stefano Cattaneo, Mauro Folci, Fabian Marcaccio, Su zanne McClelland, Carl Ostendarp, Jack Risley.Introductory essay by Anthony Iannacci
32 pages (English/Italian)
14 colour illustrations, 13 black and white
€ 15
NOTHING NEW - NIENTE DI NUOVO - May 1992
Umberto Cavenago, James Croak, Christian Eckart,Robert Feintuch, Alberto Garutti, Fabian Marcaccio, Marco Mazzucconi. Introductory essay by Anthony Iannacci
32 pages (English/Italian)
14 colour illustrations, 27 black and white
€ 15

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