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CATALOGUES

From the early seventies onwards each new show at Studio la Città has been accompanied either by a catalogue or by an information sheet about the artist's activity. Since 1994 the catalogues published in each season have been bound into a single volume. They are, however, also available singly.

Catalogs are all available at our gallery or they can be purchased online by sending a request to: pubblicazioni@studiolacitta.it



Brian Alfred

BRIAN ALFRED “Majic Window” - March 2009
brochure 8 pages - text by Roberto Pinto (Italian/English)
13 colour reproductions - € 10
preview catalogue



Majic Window

The extraordinarily normal history


Brian Alfred is an American artist who, while having a well-defined and easily recognised style, tries in every way to experiment with different compositional and technical solutions. In this show too, with its emblematic title Majic Window, paintings, collages, and 3-D animations follow each other in search of stylistic unity. Alfred’s compositional choices and the resulting images are recognisable above all for the evident and necessary three-dimensionality that they display. In fact the artist never makes use of spatial illusions, not even for a moment, in order to fool the viewers or to induce them to shift their attention on to the reality he alludes to. The surfaces of his works are flat, the result of the graphics processing which came about with the earliest digital imaging, a technique that was not yet sufficiently sophisticated to be misleading. And for this very reason it is used by the artist for the capacity of the images to question themselves about art and the mechanisms that govern those ways of communicating images which, by now, are dominant in our post-industrial society.

The roots of his work, then, dig into the territory of Pop Art, and the thought behind it often refers to Andy Warhol’s output. However, if we go even further back in time, these roots might well also be nourished by the surprising images of Ukiyo-e, the famous Japanese prints of the Edo period which were so important for many artists in the nineteenth century. Like these Japanese prints, the works by Brian Alfred often depict landscapes as well as natural elements in their most powerful and allusive actions. This American artist might well have derived from Pop Art the characteristic of analysing our way of representation by way of simple images, ones that are easily reproduced and, as a result, able to enter subtly and lightly into contact with people. (…)

Roberto Pinto



Stuart Arends

STUART ARENDS “Kid Blocks, Boxes and Boats” - October 2014
8 page brochure - with inner dossier
(Italian/English)
7 color images - € 10
STUART ARENDS “Wax” - September 2013
8 pages brochure - with text by Roberto Pinto
(English /Italian)
7 color reproductions - € 10
The PDF Series - March 2010
brochure 8 pages - texts by Angela Madesani Italian/English
7 colour reproductions
€ 10
preview catalogue



The PDF Series

Stuart Arends’ parallelepipeds are just about pocket-size. They can be held easily in a hand but they enclose the endless landscapes, the infinite skies, and the distant horizons of New Mexico where the artist has lived for many years now. These are the very territories we are used to seeing in photos of both traditional American landscape and those of the New Topographers. It is as though both are summarised here. It is as though Stuart Arends, each time, manages to capture their deepest essence: an underground essence underlined, obviously, by the colour, but mostly by the light, the limpid light of the sky and the sharp atmosphere that he experiences every day. His most recent works are realized with wax alone, almost as though to underline the lightness and transparency of the work in relation to the exhibition space, with which it creates a profound dialectical relationship. The light penetrates the parallelepiped, it insinuates itself into the material and mirrors the exterior which, in turn, fully becomes a part of it.
In this sense his development began in 1980. Arends himself explained to Johanna Littlejohns, in a conversation published in the Temporale magazine in 2008, that having discovered the idea of “painting as an object” he then came across a cardboard box which provided him with an answer. As a result, the work he made in 1980, Untitled, led to his discovery of other boxes which, by chance, were all small: but, at this point, he realized that a larger size was not necessary.
STUART ARENDS - May 2001
32 pages - text by Mark Van de Walle (Italian/English)
14 colour reproductions – 7 black/white
€ 10

Gabriele Basilico

Gabriele Basilico - Iran 1970 - Basilico prima di Basilico - 2016
brochure 8 pages - essay by Gabriele Basilico
(Italian/English)
€ 10

Carlo Battaglia

Carlo Battaglia mare ... - 2015
brochure 8 pages - essay by Marco Meneguzzo
(Italian/English)
€ 10

Eelco Brand

EELCO BRAND “Persistence of vision - Painting with Software” - 2011
brochure 8 pages - text by Lien Heyting
(English /Italian)
12 colour reproductions - € 10
EELCO BRAND - 2011
30 pages, printed by Hoffmann Druck DmbH, Wolgast
Supported by Studio la Città, Gemeente Breda, [DAM] Galley, Torch Gallery
39 colour reproductions – 6 black&white reproductions
€ 20

Luca Caccioni

LUCA CACCIONI - "ZILLIJ" - October 1995
32 pages - text by Luca Caccioni (Italian/English)
8 colour reproductions - 15 black/white
€ 12

Pier Paolo Calzolari

PIERPAOLO CALZOLARI - July 2002
32 pages – texts by Mario Bertoni and Pierpaolo Calzolari (Italian/English)
12 colour reproductions – 6 black/white
€ 15

Luigi Carboni

LUIGI CARBONI - November 2010
L’occhio si nasconde
brochure 8 pages – text by Ludovico Pratesi
(Italian/English)
6 colour reproductions
€ 10
preview catalogue



BEYOND FORM

This painting takes nothing away, it doesn't use the strategy of removal, in fact it gives free rein to marks/drawing, colour, decoration. Luigi Carboni

Luigi Carboni's art can be defined as being on the threshold between painting and image, a passageway where the short-circuit between colour and marks sparks off an emotive territory between sensibility and concept, object and vision. The large rectangular canvases reflect the golden mean of Carpaccio's Renaissance paintings for the Venetian confraternities and, like them, suggest themselves as places for silent tales without words. They are neither epic not mystical, but intimate and mental, and are animated by the semantic trajectories that Carboni knowingly keeps in an ambiguous dimension, though without ever falling into the narrative trap. This is painting that is patiently constructed around the relationship between canvas, paint, and the interweaving of images that the artist chooses for composing a visual tale based on the definition of a code that is both an evident structure and the work's hidden soul. Oriental ideograms, details of ancient and modern theatrical projects, garden-plants, reptilian scales, sophisticated vegetable racemes, targets, celestial constellations, and circular holes: all these join together in a single system that tends to become a kind of enciphered handwriting where concept and ornament are indissolubly tied together by a secret rhythm resulting from the artist's sensibility.


LUIGI CARBONI - 1985 - 2003
80 pages - texts by Luca Beatrice, Elio Cappuccio, Luigi Carboni, Luca Cesari, Vittoria Coen, Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
60 colour reproductions - 5 black/white
€ 15
LUIGI CARBONI - February 2001
32 pages - texts by Luca Beatrice and Michael Haggerty (Italian/English)
12 colour reproductions - 9 black/white
€ 10
LUIGI CARBONI/LYNN DAVIS - I CANTI DUREVOLI
32 pages - texts by Anthony Iannacci and Mario Fales (Italian/English)
5 colour reproductions - 9 black/white
€ 15

Lawrence Carroll

LAWRENCE CARROLL - May 2003
32 pages - text by Marco Meneguzzo (Italian/English)
24 colour reproductions - 13 black/white
€ 15
LAWRENCE CARROLL - July 2000
32 pages - texts by Bruno Corà and Laura Mattioli Rossi (Italian/English)
11 colour reproductions - 21 black/white
for viewing only
LAWRENCE CARROLL E UNA NATURA MORTA DI GIORGIO MORANDI - May 1996
32 pages - texts by Concetto Pozzati and Maria Elena Ramos (Italian/English)
9 colour reproductions - 59 black/white
€ 15

Vincenzo Castella

Vincenzo Castella Inside Deisha Camp Bethlehem 2007-2016 - 2016
brochure 8 pages - essay by Gabriele Sassone
(Italian / English)
€ 10
VINCENZO CASTELLA “Aiming at the dust” - December 2013
8 pages brochure - with essay by Vincenzo Castella
(Italian / English)
color reproductions - € 10
VINCENZO CASTELLA - MULTIPLICITY: “Cronache da Milano” – June 2009
brochure 8 pages
(Italian/English)
8 colour reproductions
€ 10
VINCENZO CASTELLA - “SITI 98 - 08”
catalogue 105 pages – text by Angela Madesani
(Italian/English)
81 colour reproductions - € 55
Baldini Castoldi Dalai Editore
VINCENZO CASTELLA - October 2007
24 pages - text by Stefano Boeri (Italian/English)
16 colour reproductions
€ 12

Nick Cave

Meet Me at the Center of the Earth - April 2010
brochure 8 pages - texts by Marco Meneguzzo Italian/English
5 colour reproductions
€ 10
preview catalogue



NICK CAVE

We do not know if these fantastic clothes are the barbaric fruit of a culture distant in time and space, or the prophesy of a possible future. We do not know if Nick Cave comes from afar or if he sees far. We certainly know that through him, through his works, we meet the Other, and nothing is more fatiguing than this. It is necessary to exert all our educated curiosity and amiable indulgence in order to bear what he proposes. There is a double exchange: we see sequins, beads, tiny mirrors, all the panoply of what we consider to be exotic, because this is how it is proposed and offered to us; and we use only one sense - that of sight - to place this armament in a safe place, one guaranteed by the intelligence of sight. But for this very reason it is kept at a distance, out of reach of the hands, the skin, the body. We catalogue by looking, we perceive by trying.
And so we cannot limit ourselves to looking (this seems a humanitarian exhortation destined for some Third World catastrophe...): we have to enter. In fact Nick Cave's works are nothing other than such an invitation: enter the work, move together with it, discover what labour is involved in "becoming the Other".

Max Cole

MAX COLE- 2006
32 pages - texts by Ralf Cristofori and interview by Kim Wouson (Italian/English)
12 colour reproductions - 21 black/white
€ 10

Lynn Davis

Lynn Davis, Modern Views of Ancient Treasures - 2012
Catalog of the exhibition at the National Archaeological Museum in Venice.
52 pages - texts by Marco Meneguzzo, Giovanna Damiani, Michela Sediari (Italian/English)
25 color reproductions
€ 30 - to purchase the catalog click here
LYNN DAVIS - "Modern Views of Ancient Treasures - Dans le Monde Arabe - In the Footsteps of Ibn Battuta" - December 2011
8 pages - text by Elisabetta Piatti (Italian/English)
7 colour reproductions
€ 8

Robert Feintuch

ROBERT FEINTUCH - April 1994
32 pages - texts by Nancy Princenthal and Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
29 black/white
€ 12
(Italiano/Inglese) € 30

Lucio Fontana

LUCIO FONTANA
The Fontana I Love
128 pages - essay by Luca Massimo Barbero
(Italian/English)
€ 30
preview catalogue




Lucio Fontana: sculpture as a tremor

What already in 1934 Edoardo Persico called the "Fontana legend" was literally embodied in the sculptures Fontana was making in the same period, works overflowing with innovations and with avant-garde echoes. In those early years Fontana's sculpture, in particular its new way of using such a classical material as terracotta, at once led to wide discussion and debate. A significant article published at the beginning of the decade, dealing with his way of "making sculpture" and of his work in the studio of Tullio Mazzotti, known by the Futurists as Tullio D'Albisola, gave a first indication that the artist's gestures were a part of his personality, of that impulsive experimentation that had characterised him from the very start. Attilio Podestà wrote, «In 1936, in the Mazzotti factory, Fontana modelled his first ceramic pieces thus marking a new and important step in the evolution of modern ceramics in Albissola». This refers to his strength in "sculpting the earth", in other words modelling clay, in a creative vortex that led the figure and the material to go beyond figuration and to reach what critics realised was an important anticipation of the "inchoate" climate of the following decades. (...)

Anna Galtarossa

ANNA GALTAROSSA – July 2010
Divinità Domestiche
brochure 8 pages – text by Maria Rosa Sossai
(Italian/English)
15 colour reproductions
€ 10
preview catalogue




Post Scriptum

During an interview in 1997, in answer to a question about what makes an object beautiful, Claude Lévi-Strauss said: "The totality of internal relationships that make it more compact than the other surrounding objects of experience".
We do not know if, among the beautiful anthropological objects works of art, were also included. But now, having in front of our eyes the sculptures by Anna Galtarossa, his statement has a precise critical meaning. In fact the artist's works/objects express the kind of compactness and latency that the anthropologist spoke about. The bric-a-brac of all kinds of materials - familiar knick-knacks, material gathered during her travels away from home, female-crafted works, kitsch objects, and a Euro made in China - is the boundary around her creative centre from which emerge, in contrast to the surrounding world, intimate and secret harmonies. ...

Alberto Garutti

ALBERTO GARUTTI - December 1995
10 pages - Text by Anthony Iannacci (Italian)
Black and white reproductions
€ 10

Herbert Hamak

HERBERT HAMAK “A Bunch of Roses” - September 2013
8 page brochure - with texts by Angela Madesani, Luca Massimo Barbero, Marisa Vescovo
(English /Italian)
8 color reproductions - € 10
HERBERT HAMAK - Museum Haus Lange, Krefeld - May 2010
109 pages – text by Martin Hentschel and Luca Massimo Barbero (German/English)
38 colour reproductions
HERBERT HAMAK - September 2008
40 pages - cardboard book cover
text by Angela Madesani (Italian/English)
33 colour reproductions
€ 25
preview catalogue



The Simple Complexity of Forms

In an individual’s life the perception of time is relative because historical, social, and spiritual conditionings are superimposed on it.

For many of us time is short. There is little silence. Often we are fascinated by what is ephemeral, the “here today and gone tomorrow” aspect of inexorable daily life. And art too is bullied by disposable consumerism: in a short time the product, the work, and sadly the artist too, are worn down. There is the need for continual brainwaves which, as such, must be explosive and efficacious.

We will be buried by a laugh – but in the meantime? Strokes of genius risk becoming academic; fun and enjoyable, but academic nonetheless in the worst sense of the term. Anti-conformism at all costs becomes mannerism, the wild search for the amazing. A passing amazement that is consumed as quickly as a glass of fresh water.

When we find ourselves in front of works – quite apart from the means used for them – that induce us, on the contrary, to stop and reflect, then we become aware that perhaps it is these that create a break with the cultural conformism that threatens to level out everything. And this is how it is with the works by Herbert Hamak.

It is difficult to find a definition of his works. Paintings? Sculptures? “I have never thought about sculptural interventions or, in fact, even painterly ones. It is first of all a work concerning colour that then becomes painting and, eventually, sculpture.”1 Exactly: colour in all its purity. It is as though Hamak managed to enclose it in the very definition of it. The fire in his works is the works themselves.

The changes are intimate and subtle: this is why they need long times of perception and observation so that the viewer might be led to silence and meditation. The viewer is induced to go further and discover what lies behind the physical aspect of the object, however complex it might be.

The lengthy time for perception is proportionate to that of the work’s realisation during which the colour seems to grow on itself through gradations and layers. It develops, transforms, mutates, in order to arrive at an identical rapport between density and transparency in which what is all-important is the relation created between the work and the space, whether this is a domestic space or that of a gallery, a museum, or of the great architecture which Hamak has often confronted, as in Castelvecchio, Verona, or the cathedral in Atri, Abruzzo. Here the façade of the building became a kind of musical score scattered over with blue forms. …”

HERBERT HAMAK – June 2005
16 pages – text by Michael Haggerty (Italian/English)
20 colour reproductions
€ 12
preview catalogue



“Part of the evolution of Herbert Hamak’s art has inevitably been towards an increased importance of installations, not pre-planned but created by empirically calibrating the relationship between particular works and the exhibition space. It is as though the possibilities of the physical and emotional allusions created between the varying colours and transparencies of each work could change from installation to installation, much as the transparency of the individual works changes with the changing light.

A recent development of this has been an increased concentration on works in the form of diptychs and triptychs. These are traditional forms used in the past above all for their narrative possibilities: in fact they are book-like and traditionally could even be opened and closed like a book. But for Hamak narration is a far subtler affair: the works narrate themselves to each other and are influenced and changed by this narration, permitting us both to follow this and to be drawn into their discourse.

This does not represent a great change from Hamak’s past or even other contemporary works, but it does allow a closer, more guided investigation of relationships that previously were more casual, as well as of variations of transparency and colour that can now, in this far more intimate and concentrated conversation, permit themselves an even more diaphanous subtlety. With these latest works Hamak creates an almost hypnotic world of delicate relations between the elements which, as with his large-scale ‘installations’, reach out to enter and become part of our own world.”
HERBERT HAMAK- September 2003
32 pages - text by Luca Massimo Barbero (Italian/English)
18 colour reproductions - 15 black/white
for viewing only
preview catalogue



“Does painting have a body? A body, that is, that does not only bow down under the weight of the material, under the increasing density of paint built up by the passing and passing once more of the gesture, of the paint-loaded brush? And the next question would depend on the (positive) answers to this first one: in other words, if there exists the possibility for an artist to immerse himself and then rise out and up towards the abstract heights of painting’s body, then his problem will not so much be that of realising it in its pondus, its weight, but to realise it universally, ‘absolutely’ as painting. Paradigmatic, synthetic yet never literary, Painting, almost as absent as breath, a continuous breeze, such as that that man still has not felt either here on our planet or from the stars.

At times it is possible to feel the breath of Painting. And, still more impalpable yet not more difficult than following it with the eye, it is possible to see its infinite, multiple and glowing body, and to make it material, to see it.

This could well be more than the experience of those who visit this show, of those who inevitably see its ‘breath’ and ‘body’.

Hamak, ideally and universally, thrusts ‘his hands’ into painting as an absolute essence, almost as though the very sense of the most material kind of painting might happily have found a place as ideal as a perfect and multiple physical body, continually moving and never still (beyond its appearance).

It is in this physical and ideal space that we find all the elements of painting, of the materialisation of a dream that, as such, alters, changes, and is transformed. And if the dream is transformed as a result of memory, its painted form lives and is changed thanks to its two main elements, as well known as they are vibrantly alive: light and the body of colour. …”
HERBERT HAMAK- July 2001
32 pages - texts by Mario Bertoni and Michael Haggerty (Italian/English)
13 colour reproductions
for viewing only
preview catalogue


"The Quintessence of Formed Form

Luciano Anceschi has written, "Once a work of art has passed from the artist's hand it is present, in front of the viewer or listener, with all its shapes and colours, all its images in sound, its tones and pitches. And in its expression it completely resolves both itself and what it contains. It seems to need nothing, to be happy in its self-sufficiency, to have arrived at calm and stillness. And yet its life has only just begun. In the meanwhile it reclines in silence until it is recognised and accepted. Its meaning finds nothing to refer to and the work is as though closed in expectant isolation. Its symbols seem silenced, its language new and incredible".

When a work of art appears it creates a sense of alienation as well as raising various questions, something this quotation expresses very well. Its presence is neither obvious nor banal; clichés are kept in check. And yet, full of the new meanings that it contains, it bridges a void that is both linguistic and existential. In fact the first condition the work poses is one of language and of seeing, and this is the subsequent condition of everyone else because it is a critical act. You might object that these are generalities valid for any work of art, and yet their coherence favours some artists more than others as is the case, for example, of the work of Herbert Hamak.

When looking at his untitled works, the most notable fact is certainly that they do not 'express' something because they do not have 'something to say'. His works impress because they are strongly structured, rigorous, transparent, and ambiguous entities. The transparency is such as to capture and retain light. The ambiguity lies in the vitreous consistency of the material, a midway point between solid, liquid, and airy. Its inner upheavals and turbulence are changes that have already taken place, the outcome of a process (with all its phases and reactions) of which we are now offered the stable image at an indeterminate point: consolidated and fixed but not ecstatic. …”

Mario Bertoni

Jacob Hashimoto

Jacob Hashimoto 16.05.2015
64 pages - essays by Erik Morse and Jana Grcevich (Italian/English)
€ 25



JACOB HASHIMOTO | Superabuntant Atmosphere – June 2013
monograph curated by Luca Massimo Barbero, Marsilio Ed.
(English / attached essay in Italian)
160 pages, 200 color reproductions, catalog with paperback
€ 35



JACOB HASHIMOTO | “Foundational Work” May 2013
brochure 8 pages - text by Marco Meneguzzo
(Italian/English)
colour reproductions
€ 10



JACOB HASHIMOTO ArmadaJuly 2011
61 pages - text by Leah Ollman
(Italian/English)
43 colour reproductions
€ 25



JACOB HASHIMOTO | V – May 2009
61 pages – text by Luca Massimo Barbero
(Italian/English)
47 colour reproductions
€ 30
preview catalogue


What makes nature feel like nature Jacob Hashimoto’s landscapes of vision

In this mature and extremely comprehensive show, Jacob Hashimoto looks over and analyses the past ten years in which he has worked with Studio la Città; and this he does by both reworking previous themes and by adding new groups of works created during this partnership. So for this occasion the artist gives us the possibility for perusing the new and unusual “landscapes of vision” he has created, which, in their combination of artificial and natural images, offer us an experience: a place to discover and to be enveloped in, one “almost” without limits, and yet sensuous and alive. Precisely because this show conveys the idea of a summary of a long and intensive period of work, I decided to talk with Hashimoto and ask him to explore together with me these spaces “beyond the sky”, openly shot through with the colors of western civilization, and with a subtle, fantastic, expansive lightness.

LucaMassimo Barbero: I would like to start with this idea of a landscape that belongs to this borderline between natural and artificial, as with the tree. It is wood, but it is a construction, stressed as such, with no intention to look naturalistic. It holds your hi-tech spheres of light, in a sort of architectural and structural relationship that expresses this issue of a kind of technology which is the sort of second reality you seem interested in. What is the origin and meaning of your connection between this abstract tree and the spheres?

Jacob Hashimoto: Your observations about the tree sculpture are quite accurate. I started working on the tree sculptures a number of years ago, developing them as an extension or resolution to a sculpture that I started called Microbursting Thunderhead. Thunderhead was a sculpture that was comprise of about 700 digitally designed, industrially produced spheres filled with lights. The sculpture was originally designed to hang from the ceiling and its intention was to create a sculpturally digital landscape - a landscape comprised of digitally based objects that managed to capture the sensibility of a storm....call it a 3D sculptural landscape or whatever. At the time, I was really interested in the formal, conceptual intersection between digital production modes and the analog physicality of sculpture, an intersection that I felt (and still feel) is fundamental to the development of artists in my generation - a generation that spans the vinyl and compact disk generation, a generation that learned to type on manual typewriters, who bought records and tapes and went to college with CDs. In any event, when we moved this sculpture for an exhibition in Cologne, we were faced with installing the piece in a space that didn't have a ceiling from which we could mount the sculpture. Given this, I needed to find a formal, conceptual, and structural solution that would allow me to suspend the spheres in the room. This was a tough prospect and I considered a number of architectural solutions before coming to the idea of the tree. I think that the tree as a suspension structure came originally from a book about Shinto that I was reading at the time, where I saw these beautiful images of trees completely covered in paper prayers. The idea of sacred trees was quite intriguing and coupling Thunderhead with some kind of tree sculpture as its armature seemed like a curious path. (...)

JACOB HASHIMOTO – September 2006
32 pages – text by Luca Massimo Barbero (Italian/English)
15 colour reproductions - 35 black/white
for viewing only
preview catalogue


Space Like a Breath

Jacob Hashimoto’s work really is a Luxury for the Eye and for visual perception. It could also be defined as a Feast for the Eye, but that would be imposing a limit. Probably you will be asking what the difference is between the two statements. So, a feast is thought out, organised, or it derives from momentary, ephemeral, hedonistic typicality. Luxury for the eye (not to be confused with luxury goods which, recently, have been mistaken for art objects) is difficult to arrive at, like a delicious yet, at the same time, dangerous balance that, once it has revealed itself, must remain so. For ever.

I’ve always loves Jacob’s ability to manoeuvre himself physically, together with his work, through areas and techniques and different methods while maintaining an unvaried coherence which is though, at the same time, variable. His incessant technological action with positives and negatives in his Waterblocks and, with the same concept though manually in this case, in the wall pieces reconfirms his almost paradoxical aim of repeating through variations while never repeating himself.

Working in this way he allows us a Luxury, he creates it for those of us who are viewing a complex space, so concentrated and thought through that it even seems at first sight airy and minimal, happy and carefree. Which, in fact, it isn’t, or at least it isn’t just that. Let’s take these new wall pieces as an example, almost as though using them to construct a possible story on the basis of the work of this artist, a story to be told one step at a time. For some years now monochrome white seems to be at the heart of his large-scale works. Immense white elements make up infinite suspended works. The same colour is used for various works in private collections where the elements or, as some call them, the kites are at a great height and are often seen against a light source which exalts the white purity and a symbolism that is as luminous as it is abstract. White too are the flowering spheres of his artificial and ironic Trees and so are the elements of Microbursting Thunderhead where light was the effective, electrical part of the sculpture itself. And so too are certain apparently monochrome new white wall-pieces and, in order to define them better, I would like to write that they are “anchored to the walls”, almost as though they were trying to give rhythm and order to the high points and threads that have the precise task of “anchoring these extraordinary cloudlike apparitions” to a portion of the wall and to its airy protrusion into space. …”
JACOB HASHIMOTO – June 2005
16 pages – text by Michael Haggerty (Italian/English)
16 colour reproductions
€ 12
preview catalogue


In art as in music repetition is a dangerous procedure: it often seems that there is no reason why a work should ever end while wishing that it would. But sequences were used by many baroque composers to create fascinating structures and are, in fact, still as much a part of classical as of popular music.

And sequences, small phrases repeated at varying pitches, might be kept in mind when considering the recent and past art of Jacob Hashimoto, for a creative use of them is never simple repetition but variation. In his ‘ceiling’ pieces hundreds and hundreds of identical kites were suspended to create grand masses, and here it was the different heights of the kites that created the variation. In some of his recent work, instead, he has flattened his assemblage of elements against the wall, and here it is the elements that vary in size, colour, and also at times in material, though they are ranked uniformly in length and distance from the wall. Their three-dimensionality has been compressed in comparison with other aspects of his output, but the myriad coloured elements now often playfully contradict the works’ shallow space. Physically we can see how far from the wall they are, but a step back and the space seems shaken up, small bright shapes leap outwards while others retire and visually seem to be behind the wall itself. The sequential elements give the works their undeniable stability, their monumentality even, but the dappled colours and tiny forms are what add movement, life, and creative ambiguity.
JACOB HASHIMOTO - July 2003
32 pages - text by Luca Massimo Barbero (Italian/English)
16 colour reproductions - 13 black/white
€ 15
preview catalogue


Space... is formed, traveled through, and heard. He suspends in order to meditate, he maneuvers those full/ empty paradoxical masses and, in a contemporary poem, imprisons water, light, geometry, pattern or ‘landscape’, and makes them sing together. It is as though in man’s experience nature is materialized both positively and negatively. The parts do not negate each other but interpenetrate and have the same source: they fascinate each other. And this happens in anything but a superficial way: it is the result of great curiosity, as though the eye had become a detective and the act of making simply a way of embodying these endless yet exact inquiries. Jacob reflects on the multiple essence of concretizing space, as though in his mind he had found a measurement-molecule fascinated by space and which wanted to materialize it, make it useable and visible but without overdoing it, without arriving at a heavy sense of realism. It is this extraordinary and at times (as we shall see) dangerous fascination that almost literally attacks you on entering one of his shows. Suddenly you find yourself among hundreds or thousands of units, fragments completed to form a whole, suspended marks that distribute themselves in space and form it, giving it new life rather than occupying it. And there you are, amazed and transfixed, virtually suspended yourself, counting and visually journeying through these materials (which in the past have been silk, paper, fabric) and these thousands of threads that hold up and make possible this new world ... And this is the first, elementary phase.

And then a kind of revelation makes you abandon resistance: there is no longer any decoration, any manual virtuosity or mathematical repetition, there is just the work that draws itself together, breathes, moves, and allows you to respire in another way: with the eyes, here in this room. An absolute variable is what Jacob’s past installations categorically recall.

For some years I have literally spied on his work on the few occasions I’ve been able to see it in Italy. At times I’ve experienced it briefly, at others with an almost indecent stare, almost obsessively analytical, searching every detail, each knot, link, bamboo spill, stitch or whatever. Then I allowed the images to sediment in time and, late one morning in Verona, he and I met and got to know each other without talking about the work, listening to the music he plays while hanging his show and ... Without any taping, we chatted civilly using as our excuse for talking the waters of the river Adige running nearby. … “
JACOB HASHIMOTO - February 2002
32 pages - texts by Angela Vettese and Irvin Hashimoto (Italian/English)
10 colour reproductions - 9 black/white
for viewing only
preview catalogue


Jacob Hashimoto Through European Eyes

Jacob Hashimoto's work is marked by two geographical parameters: Japan, where his father’s family came from, and Los Angeles where he lives and works. These two such apparently distant points have, in time, drawn closer together, both as a result of improved transport and, above all, because of the Pacific Ocean that links them. This has led to the increasing mixture of peoples and to the close relations between the two cultures. Nowadays there are many maps in existence that place the Pacific at the center of the world and thus underline the relationship between the two neighboring coasts.

For a European it is difficult to resist the temptation to see in Hashimoto's work an example of this link. From the Japanese side he inherits a deliberate and precise method of working, almost inconceivable for a European, one capable of creating 3000 circles of silk, each 18 centimeters in diameter, which are then suspended by threads in an airy mass that seems to descend from the heavens. For some time, in fact, Hashimoto has been making tiny kites of paper or other flexible materials held together by wooden struts and twine and then assembled in a conceptually simple but practically elaborate method.

What is now on show in Verona is the most recent evolution of a work that aims at occupying space without either the heaviness of sculpture or a reduction to a simple play of light. It is part of a tradition of complexity resolved into simplicity that is to be found as much in a fugue by Bach as in recent minimalist music. …”

Haubitz + Zoche

HAUBITZ + ZOCHE - 2004
32 pages - text by Marco Meneguzzo (Italian/English)
30 colour reproductions
€ 10

Salomon Huerta

SALOMON HUERTA - 5 October 2002
32 pages - texts by David Pagel and Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
9 colour reproductions – 6 black/white
€ 10

Hendler Huerta Kauffman

HENDLER HUERTA KAUFFMAN - May 2000
10 pages - text by David Pagel (Italian/English)
8 colour reproductions - 1 black/white
€ 5

Izima Kaoru

IZIMA KAORU – February 2005
14 pages – text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
11 colour reproductions
€ 15

Riyas Komu

Midnight’s Children – September 2010
Brochure 6 pages – text by Marco Meneguzzo (Italian/English)
6 colour reproductions
€ 10
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... Riyas Komu is an Islamic Indian sculptor living in Mumbai and he is not at all interested in the subtleties of art language. But all the same he wants to express something through this language: his is an ethical rather than aesthetic point of departure. This is why he runs the knowing risk of being a moralist. His fight against dominating ideologies is so obvious as to be pedantic: as long as we continue to be naïf, as long as we respect the rules of his ingenuity. So he can present us with red stars, hammers and sickles, saints and martyrs, swords which become screws or gimlets - with the cruel title of "Royal Screw", but also Royal Fucks or Royal Rip- off… In other words, with all the symbols of power, and these he turns into symbolic machines available to all. In other words, symbols understandable by all those who are still sufficiently ingenuous to believe in what we call exoticism but which, for half of the world, is everyday reality.

Paolo Icaro

PAOLO ICARO “Tensioni” - December 2013
8 pages brochure - with essay by Marco Meneguzzo
(Italian / English)
color reproductions - € 10

David Lindberg

DAVID LINDBERG “Room for Things to Come” - March 2009
brochure 8 pages - text by Angela Madesani
(Italian/English)
11 colour reproductions - € 10
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When Colour Guides Form

Notes on David Lindberg’s work
by Angela Madesani

David Lindberg’s work gives a fascinating and stimulating answer to the problems of today’s non-figurative painting - if, that is, such a definition and the attempt to collocate it within some thematic group still has any sense. In fact, what would be of far more interest would be to compare it to contemporary art as a whole, as a single large category that includes temporal and social questions, something that has been pointed out on various occasions by the French art sociologist Nathalie Heinich.

It is fascinating to see the working methods employed by Lindberg, an American who lives in the Netherlands, as much in order to discover his secrets and tricks as for revealing an attitude that refers back to that of artists of antiquity, even to the recipes of the fourteenth century writer of treatises Cennino Cennini. For his work the artist uses foam rubber, epoxy resins(1), glass fibre, oil paints, and pigments.

These materials are easily modelled, ductile, and they allow direct working with the hands and with non-professional and ready-to-hand tools: small knives, screwdrivers, awls. He has, in every sense, a hands-on relationship with these which alludes to craftwork. Attracted by the possibility of changing aim through his use of materials, Lindberg explores his instruments again and again: those he uses are usually employed for making models, surfboards, boats, and aeroplane parts.

This is the reason why any interpretation of the work must change during its making: usually the works are horizontal while they are being made and are then hung vertically. Tension derives from the fact that the three-dimensional aspect, through the combination of light and colour, alludes to the TV screen where the image is in movement. Lindberg’s aim is to enter into colour and its flux. With regard to this we should remember those works in which he used coloured mirrors placed at the end of cylinders where the colours of the painting are reflected.

His works do not result from any initial plan; Lindberg is inspired and deeply influenced by the nature of his materials. Most often it is the colour which creates the form. He avoids having control over everything and he allows colour to spread according to physical principles. He might indicate guiding lines but there is always an unpredictable aspect which has to be taken into account. Each work by him contains in itself the solution to a series of problems that cropped up during the working phase. Through this aspect there then bloom poetic, emotive elements that find a perfectly harmonious balance within the work. His is, therefore, an attempt to dissect and, therefore, to find solutions to the complexities that have arisen. (…)

1 Lindberg is fascinated by the slow time which resin takes to harden and its free spreading over the surface, a result of molecular force.

DAVID LINDBERG – September 2005
24 pages – text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
15 colour reproductions
€ 12

Emil Lukas

EMIL LUKAS "Large Curtain" - December 2014
8 page brochure - with inner dossier
(Italian/English)
7 color images
€ 10
EMIL LUKAS - November 2012
32 pages with color reproductions
Text by Angela Madesani (Italian/English)
€ 20
EMIL LUKAS - April 1995
32 pages - text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
5 colour reproductions - 15 black/white
€ 15
EMIL LUKAS - April 1995
special edition of 100
32 pages - board binding and small original work, signed and numbered by the artist:
"43 times in 29 days", plaster and mixed media
6 colour reproductions – 15 black/white
€ 120

Julia Mangold

JULIA MANGOLD - November 2003
32 pages - text by Marco Meneguzzo (Italian/English)
22 black and white reproductions
€ 12
JULIA MANGOLD - October 2000
32 pages - texts by Riva Casterman and Laura Mattioli (Italian/English)
12 colour reproductions - 13 black/white
€ 12

Mirco Marchelli

MIRCO MARCHELLI - March 2003
32 pages - text by Marco Vallora (Italian/English)
20 colour reproductions - 2 black/white
€ 15

Hiroyuki Masuyama

HIROYUKI MASUYAMA - December 2014
67 pages - hard cover, texts by Marco Meneguzzo and Rasmus Kleine (Italian/English)
65 color images
€ 30
HIROYUKI MASUYAMA - Novembre 2008
48 pages - cardboard book cover
text by Angela Madesani (Italian/English)
36 colour reproductions
€ 30
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Hiroyuki Masuyama’s Moralised Light-Boxes

Some years ago there was published in Italy a collection of essays by Rosalind Krauss called Reinventare il medium, Reinventing the Medium. No better definition could be given to the recent works by Hiroyuki Masuyama inspired by the paintings J.M.W. Turner made on his travels. This English painter, who lived from the end of the Eighteenth Century to halfway through the Nineteenth, was an amazing artist for his times: his works communicate a new image of the world, as was underlined by his admirer John Ruskin. He undertook an operation of great modernity: by exploiting the power of colour and light, going beyond classical perspective, and transforming reality, he came near to modern abstraction.
Masuyama is fascinated by all this and, with great intelligence, has managed to understand the sense of Turner’s interests, attracted as he is by Turner’s way of working, his obsession with the changes of light, and by the similarity between many of his sketches and the finished works. Turner’s modernity also lay in his attitude to art and its systems. At times, when he was not all that satisfied with the works about to be shown, he would, at the last minute and just before the opening, repaint his works: like a performance artist he would give a touch here and there until he was convinced of the final result. And like a modern performer he would experiment sensations on himself: to understand the force of a storm at sea he had himself tied for some hours to the mast of a ship that was near to being wrecked so as to gather the sensations, colours, and impetus of nature, that “sublime” aspect behind so much of his painting. In a copy of Goethe’s Theory of Colour, which at the time was the only available didactic essay on the phenomena of light and colour3 as related to its physical aspects, Turner, in the margin of Goethe’s phrase “So if the totality of colour reaches the eye from outside as an object, then this is fine because the sum of its active properties seems to be real to the eye”, wrote “This is the aim of painting”.
Observation and study were at the heart of Turner’s work, just as they are for Masuyama, a silent artist attentive to nature’s phenomena, to the changes of the climate, the seasons and colour, of what he is immersed in every day. His interests have nothing to do with provocation or sensationalism, but are to be collocated in an area that is both intimate and public. Angela Madesani
HIROYUKI MASUYAMA - April 2007
18 pages - text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
14 colour reproductions
€ 12
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The Mountain That Isn’t There

Siegfried Kracauer underlined it : “Photographers must in any case reproduce the objects in front of them and they have no freedom at all; the privilege of artists, instead, is that of arranging existing forms and their relative spatial relationships according to their interior vision”. And yet even the photography of Hiroyuki Masuyama seems, at first sight, a passive reproduction of reality. Like the married couple Bernd and Hilla Becker (teachers at the Düsseldorf art school, the city where Masuyama has his studio) he gives the impression of using his means in the simplest way, without the use of particular lenses and without searching for specific framing effects. Paradoxically, it actually seems that what controls his way of photographing is the nature itself of the element being reproduced: otherwise how could we explain the obsessive, methodical photographing, month after month, years even, of parks, rooms, and landscapes?

But it is in this very persistence of the object - almost to the point of touching and entering into a close relationship with it, -that Masuyama’s eye goes beyond pure and simple data to discover an enigmatic rapport that transcends it: that inherent latent symbolic network, that halo of possible dimensions surrounding and overarching it. It is sufficient to observe the multiplicity of shots that record one of the many journeys made by the artist (e.g. from Frankfurt to Tokyo, London to Tokyo, Miami to Anchorage) in order to become aware that the passing of time coincides with its length, that the duration of the hours is tied to a place and, therefore, to standing still in time. And this fixity/moving duality in some way eliminates any kind of “reality principle”. We no longer see a fact but an event caught in its development, on the very cusp of what our mind already knows and what is still unknown.

It is obvious that to achieve all this Masuyama is obliged to make use of digital modification that adds, subtracts, changes, and retouches until a complete superimposition of the external landscape (what is known) and the internal landscape (what is imaginary, unknown) is arrived at. …”
HIROYUKI MASUYAMA - December 2004
18 pages - text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
14 colour reproductions
€ 12
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“Photographic representation has often been thought of as a re-presentation (or reproduction) of what exists, the testimony of some objective datum. But even when it can seem a chilly, almost petrified record of the world, it always ends up showing us a new world, a never previously seen view. It never captures reality in itself, but only suggests a part, a section: that point of view that corresponds to the photographer’s eye and to its inevitable individuality. And so each image becomes the world of the photographer himself and not in any way a means by way of which he might understand what he saw in front of him. Susan Sontag has also underlined this: ‘Photographs cannot explain anything’. But perhaps it is just as a result of this that they are transformed into ‘inexhaustible invitations to deduction, to speculation and imagination’.

It can be taken for granted that this kind of photography does not produce an invented image but re-invents the subject in hand, reformulating it in the form of an image, in an evocative simulacrum. So much so that each act of duplication also means an act of re-creation, as happened with the photographer in Antonioni’s Blow-up who, like an alchemist, produced and reproduced in his studio an infinite series of prints, knowing well that ‘under the revealed image there is another still more faithful to reality, and underneath this there is another (…). And so on as far as the real image of that absolute, mysterious image that no one will ever see.

Well then, Hiroyuki Masuyama’s lightbox Flowers (which could be considered as a kind of symbol of the whole exhibition) seems to make use of this double shift: on the one hand there is a move towards explosion, to the forward breakthrough of the image, and, on the other, towards its implosion, its absorption into a grid of dots leaving a trace of particular visual peculiarities. It is a passage from maximum vision to seeing nothing, an attempt at seeing the invisible or, at least, at alluding to it. In showing the festive yet banal scene of a field, Masuyama apparently enacts something that cannot be represented (or that is incommensurable), like the magnet spoken of by Tarkovsky which, in its essence as a field of force, is concealed behind an obvious reproduction of a piece of iron. Except that Masuyama shoots some 400 frames of his subject, then puts them together digitally, alternating the shots of night and day. So the image is no longer the evidence of a single view but of many concentrated views mixed together. The image is not the confirmation of some objective reality but creates a potential, complex, plural reality. It does not limit itself to comprehending the secret identity of a place, but individuates its otherness by way of an unprecedented union of being and becoming (or also of act and potential). …”
HIROYUKI MASUYAMA- March 2004
18 pages - text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
14 colour reproductions
solo in visione
HIROYUKI MASUYAMA- April 2002
16 pages - text by Carl Friedrich Schroer (Italian/English/German)
14 colour reproductions
solo in visione

John McCracken

JOHN McCRACKEN - November 1998
pages 32 - text by Angela Vettese (Italian/English)
7 colour reproductions - 17 black/white
€ 15

Michael Najjar

Michael Najjar: outer space 2014
176 pages - essays by Buzz Aldrin, Anousheh Ansari, Andreas Beitin, Pierre Cox, Norman Foster, Michael López-Alegría, Camilla Péus and Tim Smit
Distanz
(English/German)
€ 60
Michael Najjar - 2012
high altitude
catalog of 64 pages - texts by Kevin Slavin e Paul Wombell
(English)
Kerber Photo Art Editions
29 colour reproductions
€ 30

Jagannath Panda

Midnight’s Children – September 2010
brochure 6 pages – text by Marco Meneguzzo (Italian/English)
6 colour reproductions
€ 10
preview catalogue




... The paintings and sculptures by Jagannath Panda ponder on the eternal dilemma of nature and culture. Nature, represented in a holographic way by gazelles with liquid eyes and multicoloured birds that fly across the canvas, contrasts with aspects of contemporary culture (in the widest sense) consisting of huge buildings full of people, of speeding cars, of a mechanical dynamism absolutely incomprehensible to the astonished and soft eyes of the animals. But this is not a question of the usual nostalgia for a state of pure nature versus modern frenzy, because Panda's nature is anything but helpless: but is dangerous; dangerous because it mutates and therefore is unknown: his sculptures, above all, bear witness to these disturbing metamorphoses. ...

Balaji Ponna

The things I say - April 2010
brochure 8 pages - texts by Marco Meneguzzo Italian/English
12 colour reproductions
€ 10

Florio Puenter

FLORIO PUENTER - September 2004
16 pages - text by Alberto Zanchetta (Italian/English)
2 colour reproductions - 14 black/white
€ 10

Roberto Pugliese

ROBERTO PUGLIESE "Concerto per natura morta" - February 2014
8 pages brochure - with internal essay by Valerio Dehò and an interview by Olimpia Eberspacher
(English /Italian)
€ 10
"Aritmetiche Architetture Sonore" - May 2012
brochure 8 pages - text by Ludovico Pratesi
(English /Italian)
7 colour reproductions - € 10

Ross Rudel

ROSS RUDEL - May 2004
24 pages - text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
18 colour reproductions - 5 black/white
€ 10

Mario Schifano

MARIO SCHIFANO “DISEGNI, COLLAGES E ACETATI” - September 1999
32 pages - text by Demetrio Paparoni (Italian/English)
54 colour reproductions - 11 black/white
€ 15
MARIO SCHIFANO "OMAGGIO" - January 1991
64 pages - text by Giampiero Vincenzo (Italian/English)
85 colour reproductions - 8 black/white
€ 20
MARIO SCHIFANO -"VERO AMORE" - March 1990
48 pages - text by Giampiero Vincenzo (Italian/English)
20 colour reproductions - 13 black/white
€ 20

Jonathan Seliger

JONATHAN SELIGER - November 2000
32 pages - text by Terry R. Myers (Italian/English)
31 colour reproductions - 15 black/white
€ 10

David Simpson

DAVID SIMPSON - Wall toys for adults - 2016
brochure 8 pages - essay by Marco Meneguzzo
(Italian / English)
€ 10
DAVID SIMPSON - June 2016
268 pages - cardboard book cover, text by Louis Grachos, Jonathon Keats, Kenneth Baker and David Simpson (English)
€ 65
DAVID SIMPSON - July 2008
60 pages - cardboard book cover
text by Angela Madesani (Italian/English)
35 colour reproductions
€ 30
DAVID SIMPSON - October 2001
32 pages - text by Kenneth Baker (Italian/English)
11 colour reproductions - 4 black/white
€ 12

Ettore Spalletti

ETTORE SPALLETTI - October 2007
70 pages - cardboard book cover
35 colour reproductions
€ 30

Jessica Stockholder

JESSICA STOCKHOLDER - January 1996
32 pages - text by Anthony Iannacci (Italian/English)
8 colour reproductions - 15 black/white
€ 15

Mikhael Subotzky

MIKHAEL SUBOTZKY - September 2012
complete catalog, 490 pages with color images (English)
€ 40
MIKHAEL SUBOTZKY - December 2007
16 pages - text by Roberto Pinto
16 colour reproductions
€ 15

Sirio Tommasoli

SIRIO TOMMASOLI - February 1999
32 pages - text by Peter Weiermair (Italian/English/German)
13 colour reproductions - 3 black/white
€ 10

Timothy Tompkins

TIMOTHY TOMPKINS “Temporal Arcadia” - February 2009
brochure 8 pages - text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
6 colour reproductions - € 10
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AFTER

When the Past becomes Present


The history of images has always been concerned with U-turns, survivals, and recuperations. The past has never stopped hounding the present. Walter Benjamin wrote, “The relationship between what has already happened and the here-and-now is a dialectic one”: this is not a steady course but a discontinuous, organised, progressive fact. It is knowledge in movement, a reappearance in time of the relevance of the present similar to that of an unhappy ghost, a “revenant” still full of potential.

This is rather how Timothy Tompkins perceives and deals with reality (the here-and-now) with all its social, personal, and cultural questions; he does so by holding on to the force that comes from the tradition of images. After Friedrich, After Corot, After Turner, After Latour etc. are not, then, a simple inventory or a mere quotation of figures taken from art history, but a rediscovery of the very roots of painting, the intrinsic sources of working. In other words, Tompkins is interested in memory as a process and not as a result; as “controversies of memory” and not as “remembered fact”. We are far distant from the solid, carefully nurtured supremacy that historical positivism uses to fuel the objects of its knowledge: for the historian we are dealing with objects from the past; Tompkins, instead, deals with objects (or images) that continue to pass by and that generate new objects for knowledge.

But there is another question that seems to involve the whole range of this Californian artist’s work, and this is the conviction that the time we live in is not necessarily that which we know best, that chronological contiguity really does not illuminate things and facts with the light of familiarity. He gives the impression of doubting that the nearer we are, the greater the understanding, and that to keep his eye fixed on his own time means inevitably to perceive and grasp it better in all its aspects. He prefers to take up a position that has in itself a kind of disconnectedness and displacement with respect to topicality. (…)

Luigi Meneghelli

TIMOTHY TOMPKINS - November 2006
16 pages - text by Luigi Meneghelli (Italian/English)
31 colour reproductions
€ 15

Hema Upadhyay

The Princesses' Rusted Belt - December 2011
brochure 8 pages – text by Marco Meneguzzo (Italian /English)
6 colour reproductions
€ 10
Midnight’s Children – September 2010
brochure 6 pages – text by Marco Meneguzzo (Italian/English)
6 colour reproductions
€ 10
preview catalogue

... The works on show by Hema Upadhyay have the typical format of a painting but with an extension, a horizontal prolongation (a canopy? A seat?) at the top and the bottom that changes these pictures into "things". Not objects but "things": for some time now objects have found a place in art languages, while a "thing" is extraneous to everything, it is something indefinite and indefinable, it is a disturbance, an interference. The humble houses piled on top of each other represent disturbance and interference; they are the barracks of Mumbai - and of every other Indian city - which do not allow planned architecture to be appreciated in its perfect correspondence to the project: they fight against it with all their hungry and vital presence. ...
HEMA UPADHYAY: “When the Bees Suck,There Suck I ” – May 2009
brochure 8 pages – text by Marco Meneguzzo (Italian/English)
6 colour reproductions
€ 10
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NO MYSTERY

The remains of out-of-date ideas about exoticism still lead us to believe that the East – the whole of the East – is the home of a symbolism as old as it is obscure. Its sense of mystery is hidden behind codes we do not understand and, for this reason, they seem to us to be particularly intricate and suggestive of just “why” they hover on the very limits of what cannot be understood. Someone is hiding something; and what is hidden is certainly more rare and precious than what reveals itself to our eyes. This is the reason why there is such an interest in Asian art (apart, of course, from an interest in the particular art-market that involves over half of the planet…). And yet this sense of what is arcane and enigmatic is a great misunderstanding. It is influenced on the one hand by our desire to maintain the mystery of our own life and, on the other, by our ignorance of the expressive languages used today in India, China, and the southeast of Asia (and also in Africa, Islam etc.). In fact, in most cases these expressive codes are quite obvious and can almost be superimposed on the literary meaning that they want to propose: Hema Upadhyay’s work Where the Bees Suck There Suck I is a concrete example.
A gigantic machine overwhelms a mass of small villages: multicoloured houses in which we can recognise the newly-constructed slums of such cities as Mumbay or Calcutta, and from this there derives the menacing power, the prevarication, and the leverage which dictates and destroys our desire to continue to live: an instinctive human wish. (...)

Massimo Vitali

MASSIMO VITALI - October 2014
8 page brochure - with inner dossier
(Italian/English)
7 riproduzioni a colori
€ 10

Pablo Zuleta Zahr

PABLO ZULETA ZAHR - July 2008
20 pages - text by Stefanie Kreuzer (Italian/English)
20 colour reproductions
€ 12

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